Use Trusted Sources When Searching Online

Bahrns Equipment

If you are like most people, you probably use the Internet to find the products and service you need more often than not. Thanks to the Digital Revolution, whether you use a laptop, tablet, or smartphone, just about anything you want or need is only a few taps away.

Yet it is still relatively early in this new way of conducting business. All the bugs haven’t been worked out yet. And there’s still a lot of work to be done in terms of oversight and regulation — especially because online commerce allows customers and vendors to easily cross international boundaries.

As a result, there are still a lot of scammers, spammers, and dishonest players. The Wild West environment that exists as e-commerce figures itself out can lead to a lot of frustration. That’s why when it comes to the materials handling products you need, you should always rely on trusted sources such as Bahrns.com.

Caveat Emptor

The phrase, “caveat emptor” — Latin for “let the buyer beware” — is more relevant today than at any other time in business history. When you type a keyword describing the product or service you are looking for s into Google, Yahoo, or another search engine, you instantaneously get hundreds, thousands, or even millions of results.

But how can you tell which are trustworthy and which are not? Google is simply an algorithm, not a gatekeeper. While it may work toward protecting its users against dishonesty, it deals with literally billions of searches a day. So it’s hard for Google to provide security on every single one of them.

Use Trustworthy, Reliable Businesses

You probably have heard horror stories about people buying something online only to discover that the seller used a “bait and switch” scam, that the product wasn’t delivered at all, or that returning the product was next to impossible.

That’s why it’s so important to do business online only with trusted, reliable companies. Bahrns has been providing its customers with the finest materials products and equipment since before the Internet was even invented. We have built our reputation one customer interaction at a time, whether it is in person, over the phone, or online.

There’s still a lot of details to work out before e-commerce can be trusted to provide 100 percent of the products and services you want. Until then, you can rely on Bahrns.com to offer you the top-quality materials handling products you want with the outstanding personalized customer service you expect.

3 Types of Safety Products You Didn’t Know You Needed

Safety ProductsWhen it comes to workplace safety, there’s practically no such thing as too much safety equipment. Anything you can add to your workplace that will reduce the risk of injury to workers or damage to property or products is at least worth considering.

Personal protective equipment is one of the most popular options for improving workplace safety and reducing risks. Things like protective goggles, noise-reducing headphones, anti-fall harnesses, and even steel-toed boots can make workers safer as they go about their jobs.

But environmental safety equipment should also be considered. Rather than things workers can wear to be safer, environmental safety equipment includes things you can add to your workplace to prevent accidents and reduce risks. Here are five examples.

Safety Products — Self-Closing Faucets

Equipment that controls or limits the flow of materials, such as self-closing faucets, create an added level of safety that can save lives while protecting property, equipment, and products.  As the name implies, self-closing faucets will shut themselves off unless they are physically held open by hand.

This is useful when working with potentially harmful drum liquids, such as caustic substances, fuel, liquids that are high in acidity, and other dangerous materials. Self-closing faucets offer more control over the flow of such substances, improving the safety of workers and the workplace.

Safety Products — Plunger Cans

In many workplaces, spills are a common occurrence. Runoff from manufacturing processes, cleaning of materials or products, and even routine maintenance can require workers to wet a sponge or towel and wipe up spills almost constantly. In environments like these, plunger cans can be a godsend.

Plunger cans contain a cleaning liquid, such as water or a mild astringent. On top, they feature a pan attached to a spring and plunger. All the worker has to do is place their rag on the pan and push down and the plunger can will automatically moisten it for easy and quick cleanup. Whatever remaining liquid is in the pan will simply drain back into the can for next time.

Safety Products — Safety Cabinets

Oftentimes, where potentially dangerous materials are stored is just as important as how they are handled. Safety cabinets are available in a wide variety of shapes and sizes to store everything from gas cans to propane tanks to high explosives, depending on your needs.

Safety cabinets let you store materials safely and securely out of the way, reducing the risk of rupture or accidental spills.

Browse the safety equipment page on the Bahrns.com website to discover other types of helpful, secure safety equipment that can help protect your people and workplace.

Bulb Siphon Pumps Offer Convenience, Safety

Bulb Pump Siphon

Anyone who has ever had to siphon gas out of a car or truck can testify to the value of having a bulb siphon pump. The alternative — using your mouth and lungs to get enough suction to start the gas moving through the siphon hose — is not only distasteful, it can also be dangerous.

Bulb siphon pumps are the ideal way to initiate any type of siphoning procedure, whether it’s getting fuel out of a gas tank, draining liquid chemicals from a barrel, or any other type of liquid transfer. They are safe, effective, and convenient tools to have around any shop or warehouse.

With a bulb siphon, the hand-pumped bulb begins the process of pulling the liquid into the hose so that it can travel up the side of the container before being pulled down into the spillway, whether it’s into a sewer, a bucket, or some other landing place. In other words, the bulb does the work of your mouth and lungs, preventing the liquid from accidentally getting into your mouth.

While a little gasoline probably won’t hurt you, it’s certainly not going to taste very good. But trying the traditional method of siphoning a more caustic liquid such as a high acid or dangerous chemical just isn’t practical.

How Siphon Pumps Work

Interestingly, not all scientists agree on how liquid can be forced to flow uphill by means of a siphon. There are two theories about how it works.

The first is based on hydrodynamics, or the idea that water and other liquids will always seek its own level. Once the liquid has been pulled up and over the side of the tank, barrel, or another container via suction, gravity will pull the liquid down the hose where there is reduced pressure.

Atmospheric pressure pushes the liquid from the upper container into the reduced pressure at the top of the siphon in the same way a straw will pull soda up into your mouth. Then it flows downhill naturally.

The Problem with Siphon Physics

But this theory is undermined by the fact that siphons will work in a vacuum, where there is no atmospheric pressure. They also work at heights higher than the barometric height of the liquid.

Which brings us to the second theory, called cohesion theory, which says the liquid is pulled over the siphon the same way a chain model works. In a chain model, the lower section is heavier than the top section, so it pulls the top section down.

Which theory is correct? Modern science can’t agree. But one that everybody can agree on is that just about every workplace needs to have a bulb siphon pump for when it’s needed.

 

 

Hot Weather, Direct Sun Can Be Dangerous to Workers

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

As summer heads into the “dog days” — with prolonged high temperatures and unrelenting sun — businesses need to protect their workers. Heat illness can cause permanent injury to people and can put employers at risk of liability if they don’t take steps to prevent it.

The key to preventing heat-related injuries can be reduced to three simple words: Water, rest, and shade.

Materials Handling and Heat 

While about 40 percent of heat-related worker deaths occur in the construction industry, employees working in the materials handling industry are also at risk of heat illness. Moving products on and off trucks, into and out of storage facilities, and even on the open road can expose workers to dangerously high temperatures.

You don’t have to be old and out of shape to be affected by high heat. Anybody can become a victim of heat illness, regardless of their age or physical condition. All it takes is prolonged exposure to high temperatures without doing anything to mitigate the risks.

Shared Responsibility

Both employers and their workers have a responsibility to helping prevent heat illness. Workers need to be aware of their environment and to take special care when it’s hot.

They can pay attention to the weather forecast and not wear heavy clothes when it’s going to be hot, for example. Or they can let their supervisor know when their worker conditions are getting too warm so that they can drink more water and take more frequent breaks.

Employers can provide workers with cool water throughout their shift. You don’t have to wait until the mercury rises to the point where conditions are uncomfortable. It’s a good idea to have chilled bottled water or access to cold tap water available at all times.

Working in Warm Weather Conditions

People are able to work more productively in hot conditions if they allow themselves to become acclimated to higher temperatures. When the weather gets really hot, reduce workloads and increase breaks. Gradually increase the length of time between breaks as workers become more acclimatized and build a tolerance for working in the heat.

It’s important, however, to pay attention to workers so you can watch for signs of heat illness. Heat cramps, rashes, and exhaustion can indicate that a worker is suffering from heat illness. Take them out of the hot conditions and cool them down immediately to prevent their condition from escalating to heat stroke.

If conditions worsen or the person remains uncomfortable due to the heat, call 9-1-1 and seek emergency medical treatment.

In the hottest weeks of summer, everybody has to be aware of the dangers of heat illness.

 

 

 

Marketing to a Millennial Customer Base

Millennials may be self-absorbed and have short attention spans, but they are tomorrow’s key consumers. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

While older generations like to mock Millennials for being over-protected, over-privileged, and unmotivated, the reality of time dictates that today’s newest generation is going to be tomorrow’s key demographic for businesses everywhere.

Someday in the not-to-distant future, Millennials will run just about everything. So learning the latest generation’s buying preferences and online expectations will only help today’s businesses prepare for the next wave of commerce.

Millennial Strategies

According to a new survey conducted by Radial, an online omnichannel commerce and technology company, young people who were raised in a world where online ordering and free delivery were the norm are only going to be more demanding when it comes to speedy delivery times, order status, and ease of returns.

While many older adults may find Millennials self-involved and short-attention-spanned, today’s younger generation will be tomorrow’s primary consumers. And according to the Radial survey, they are going to want their deliveries faster and without having to pay extra for the privilege. In fact, 33.5 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds surveyed said right now it generally takes too long to receive their online orders.

Of the same group, 20.6 percent said paying more for faster priority delivery wasn’t worth the convenience. And 12.6 percent said they had concerns about their packages being stolen.

Rising Consumer Expectations

But Millennials aren’t the only ones who are becoming spoiled by the eCommerce revolution. According to the survey, 74.9 percent of US respondents across all age groups said they prefer to have their packages delivered to their front doorstep rather than allowing drivers access to their home, having to go pick up their deliveries at a locker, or letting a neighbor sign for them.

And 44.1 percent of survey participants in the US said they expected businesses to proactively update them on the status of their delivery, rather than having to check on it themselves. Plus, 36.8 percent said they wanted their deliveries shipped in environmentally-friendly packaging.

Preparing for Tomorrow’s Consumers

Online ordering, free same-day delivery, and enhanced interaction with the consumer throughout the fulfillment process are quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception for eCommerce retailers. To be successful, businesses will need to adjust to this new reality, according to Sean McCartney, Radial’s executive vice president of operations services.

“Fulfillment is one of the biggest elements impacting customer experience today, but unfortunately many businesses still approach it as an afterthought,” McCartney said. “To execute a successful door-to-door strategy, companies must shift their mindset to be channel agnostic, offer seamless execution, and real-time communication across any commerce medium.”

The expectations of Millennials, Baby Boomers, and consumers or every generation are evolving. Smart companies would do well to pay attention.

Improving Delivery Time and Accuracy

Consumers and retailers today both want their orders faster than ever before.

Just a few years ago, 3 to 5 business days would be considered an acceptable delivery window for online orders. Today, the expectation is closer to 24 hours or less. Call it the “instant gratification” effect.

Big companies like Amazon are in the process of developing all kinds of sophisticated, high-tech ways to meet consumers’ shrinking delivery window expectations, including pilot-less drones, floating warehouses, and even underground tunnels.

Even if these are all still years away from reality, huge online retailers still have the advantage over small businesses because they have more resources they can allocate to expedite faster delivery. But there are still a few tricks small businesses can use to speed up delivery, minimize loss or damage, and keep their delivery system both fast and efficient.

Damaged and Missing Products

One of the easiest ways to lose a customer for life is to deliver their products broken or damaged or shorting them on their order.

Any time you physically move objects from one place to another, there is a risk of damage and loss. But it’s possible to minimize this risk by using a simple solution: Doubling down on the amount of plastic wrap you use to wrap pallets.

Most in-transit damage is caused by products falling from the pallet during transport. Similarly, products that go missing are frequently found later in the back of the delivery truck because they fell off the pallet. But using more plastic wrap and wrapping the pallet all the way to the top so that all the pallets are covered can help prevent these issues from occurring.

Wrong Products Delivered

Another common problem is retailers getting the wrong products when they unpack their pallets. Often this is a picking issue. But it also can be a delivery problem as well.

Taking more time to properly pack pallets at the warehouse or fulfillment center can help with the former. But taking care to load the delivery van so that the pallets are in the proper delivery sequence can ensure drivers are dropping off the right orders at the right places. This not only cuts delivery time, but improves order efficiency and accuracy as well.

It’s also a good idea to place a copy of the invoice or order sheet inside each pallet’s plastic wrapping so that drivers can see at a glance which orders go where.

Retailers and other customers are always going to want their deliveries to be fast, undamaged, and accurate. Taking time and care can help small businesses compete with the big players even in the age of instant gratification.

 

 

Benefits of Separating Trash and Recyclables

garbage cansWhat’s in your trash can? The answer to that question can affect not only your business’s profitability but also its reputation.

Today, most communities have some type of residential recycling program. Many towns and cities also work with businesses to recycle production waste, used packaging materials, and other environmentally friendly post-production materials.

In the US, an estimated 1.51 lbs of materials are recycled per person per day, according to a 2013 study by the Pew Research Center. In addition, people and businesses are doing a better job of producing less trash in the first place. The same study found that per capita waste generation fell from 4.7 lbs per day per person to 4.4 pounds per day, resulting in a total annual reduction in municipal solid waste (the stuff that goes to the dump) by about 3 million tons.

Recycling and Business

Consumers create a lot of trash. But so do businesses. Things like byproducts, leftover packaging materials, and other post-production materials can quickly add up.

But an increasing number of businesses are discovering that participating with local recycling programs or launching their own recycling initiatives can not only reduce the amount of waste the enterprise generates, but also improve employee morale, enhance the company’s reputation in the community, and even help boost their brand.

Something as simple as providing separate containers for garbage and recyclables in employee break rooms and other areas throughout your facility can help minimize your business’s carbon footprint. And every effort you make to make the community (and the world) a cleaner, safer place is an opportunity publicize your business’s environmentally friendly approach toward recycling.

Recycling Containers

Many towns and cities that have recycling programs will provide containers for residents. But businesses are often left on their own to collect and separate their cans, bottles, paper, and other recyclables.

Purchasing separate receptacles for waste and recyclable materials is a fast and easy way to show your employees, and your community, that you care about your business’s impact on the community in which you live and work. In just a single afternoon, you can take a huge step toward enhancing your business’s reputation and standing within the community.

People are getting more conscious about the effect they have on the world at large. By thinking globally and acting locally, your business can help reduce pollution while at the same time being a better neighbor and a more environmentally conscious member of your local community.

Flu Season Is Here … Is Your Business Ready?

Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Nickki Gowing receives an intranasal mist of the flu vaccine. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons and in the public domain)
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Nickki Gowing receives an intranasal mist of the flu vaccine. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons and in the public domain)

Every year between in the fall and winter, millions of people become sick in the US due to the flu.

This year, the flu is particularly bad. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control recently announced every part of the continental US had “widespread” flu activity.

Colds and the flu not only take their toll physically, but they also can affect businesses financially. Absenteeism, loss of productivity, and medical treatment of employees can be significant in years when the flu is bad, like this year. In fact, the CDC estimates the direct cost of the flu on US businesses to be approximately $10.4 billion in direct costs for hospitalizations and outpatient visits for adults.

Preparing for the Flu’s Arrival

It’s not a matter of if the flu will arrive in your area, but when.

When the flu starts to appear in a city, a town, or even a single business it can start to spread exponentially. In a period of just a few weeks or even a couple of days, it can jump from person to person, taking its toll on people of every age.

The flu can even be fatal, especially for the elderly, young children, and people with compromised immune systems.

For businesses, taking steps to prepare for the flu and to prevent its spread once it arrives is of critical importance. The CDC recommends that businesses encourage its workers to get vaccinated against the flu, or even sponsor on-site vaccinations.

Prevention and Control

The flu virus is spread a number of ways: It can be passed through skin-to-skin contact, it can become airborne when a person infected with the flu sneezes or coughs, and it can even sit dormant on surfaces like counters or light switches.

Once somebody who is not infected comes into contact with the virus, they can introduce it into their system by touching their face, eyes, nose, or mouth. Within just a couple of hours, they can begin to feel the devastating symptoms of the flu, including diarrhea, vomiting, muscle aches, headaches, fever, and sore throat.

Prevention begins with creating a culture within the organization.

In addition to encouraging people to get vaccinated, businesses also should ask workers to stay home if they feel sick, avoid unnecessary contact with people who may be infected, and prevent exposure risks by cleaning desks, counters, light switches, and other surfaces frequently with anti-bacterial wipes.

Dealing with the flu is something businesses have to contend with every fall and winter. The good news is every year flu season also comes to an end in the spring.

 

 

Ladders, Ice, and Snow Can Be a Deadly Combination

Photo courtesy of Andreas Tille courtesy of  Wikimedia Commons
Photo courtesy of Andreas Tille courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Just because it’s winter doesn’t mean outdoor operations stop. In fact, many operations are busier during the year’s coldest months than they are in the spring and summer.

There are still orders to fill, supplies to be stored, inventory to be counted, and all the other responsibilities that are necessary for a successful business — including occasionally climbing up on a ladder.

Yet using a ladder in winter weather is much more hazardous than climbing one in warm, sunny weather. Rungs can be covered in ice and snow. Freezing temperatures mean workers are likely to be bundled in more clothing. And fast-moving winter winds can easily push a ladder over or cause a climber to tumble.

Employer Responsibilities

During the winter, ladder use should be limited to only those tasks that are absolutely essential. If there are other alternatives — such as using a cherry picker, scissor lift, or forklift equipped with a work platform attachment — these may be both safer and more efficient.

If you do require workers to climb up on a ladder outdoors in wintry weather, you may be held responsible if something goes wrong. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration,  employers are required to protect workers from falls at any height higher than 4 feet for normal work, and higher than 6 feet for construction work.

Removing Snow Safely

One of the most common outdoor tasks requiring ladders in the winter is removing snow from products, supplies, shelving, roofs, and other areas. Snow can cause damage to property, especially if it is wet and heavy. Getting snow off materials provides more access. But it also lets customers and clients see products, supplies, and materials, which can help boost sales.

Before ordering any worker to climb up a ladder during winter, it’s important that they know what they are doing and are aware of the dangers. If necessary, you should supply the proper fall protection equipment. Depending on the height, this may include safety harnesses, guard rails, slip-resistant boots and ladder steps, or other gear.

Getting Up and Down Safely

Workers should be assigned to teams of at least two people so that one person is never climbing a ladder alone and unsupervised. If a fall should occur and the worker is caught by his or her fall protection system, the other worker can alert others for help and assist in getting their partner down safely.

Using ladders in the winter poses multiple hazards. Following best safety practices can help reduce accidents and injuries, as well as employer liability.

 

Snow-Laden Roofs Offer Numerous Hazards

Heavy snow can put buildings at risk (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)
Heavy snow can put buildings at risk (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

So far, most places in the US have been spared from the heaviest snowfalls. But it’s just a matter of time before a whopper of a storm dumps many inches, or even feet, of snow on roads, sidewalks, and buildings.

Heavy buildups of snow add additional weight to roofs and support beams. Too much can cause a collapse. But removing snow from buildings’ roofs also has its risks.

Significant Hazards

Workers climbing onto icy, snow-covered roofs put their health at risk in more ways than just falling. For one thing, it’s bound to be cold up there. Frost and hypothermia from cold temperatures and high winds can cause injury very quickly.

Roofs that laden with snow already have a higher risk of collapse. Adding the weight of workers only increases it.

Working in extreme conditions lifting heavy snow can easily cause overexertion. After every winter snow, hospital emergency rooms are jammed with older, overweight adults suffering from heart attacks and other maladies related to trying to shovel too much snow too quickly.

Then there’s the risk of shock or electrocution from buried wires, hanging power lines, or damaged extension cords.

Removing Roof Snow Safely

Whenever possible, the best plan is often to do nothing at all. Don’t put workers at risk by requiring them to climb onto snowy, icy roofs in severe weather conditions — especially if it’s not necessary.

Rather than getting on the roof, use ladders to apply de-icing materials or use rakes or draglines that can be operated from ground level.

Get an engineering assessment about how much weight your roof can actually hold. Most communities have building codes that require structures to withstand the weight of even the heaviest snow.

When There’s No Other Choice

If your roof is at risk of imminent collapse, the best approach is to hire professionals to clear the snow for you. Provide workers with the proper safety equipment to minimize the risk of injury or death, such as fall protection equipment, ladders, or aerial lifts.

Workers climbing onto roofs should be alert of unexpected sounds or movement, which could indicate an imminent collapse or snowslide.

Use rakes or brooms to remove snow uniformly across the roof. Unbalanced loading can increase the risk of roof collapse or snowslides. Don’t push snow into piles on the roof. Instead, push or throw it off the roof as you go.

Provide intense supervision whenever putting workers at risk by requiring them to climb onto a snowy roof. Have a plan for rescuing workers in case something goes wrong.

Most importantly, if there’s no real risk of damage to your building, don’t put workers at risk. Eventually, the snow will melt on its own.